joilieder:

Fred Goeller House in Kiamath Falls, Oregon.  Photo by Patty.

joilieder:

Fred Goeller House in Kiamath Falls, Oregon.  Photo by Patty.

(via victorianhouses)

hahahhaha

(Source: nataliedormier, via drabble-of-potter)

incidentalcomics:

Conflict in Literature

incidentalcomics:

Conflict in Literature

(via prettybooks)

To grow up is to wonder about things; to be grown up is to slowly forget the things you wondered about as a child.

Henning Mankell, When the Snow Fell

We have such a long history that when I look into his eyes that’s all I can see. I forget the stupidity of what we’ve done and who could get hurt. I just remember the man who loved me once.

K. A. Linde, Avoiding Responsibility 

Sometimes when you think you have nothing, you realize you have yourself, and that’s something.

Lindy Zart, Take Care, Sare

ultrafacts:

Want More facts? Follow the Ultrafacts Blog

These dudes are legit.  They don’t just show up one day in court, either, they actually make friends with the kids and let them know they have a support system and that there are people in the world who care about them and will always have their back.  And less important, but also cool, is that the few times a couple of them have come into my cafe, they’ve been super friendly and polite and when I told one of the guys that I noticed his Bikers Against Child Abuse patch and wanted him to know how awesome I thought he was because of it, he got kind of shy and blushed and said, “The kids are the awesome ones, we just let them know they’re allowed to be brave.”

(Source: ultrafacts, via trashybooks)

Right on

Right on

(Source: indigo-aurora, via a-thousand-words)

fuckyeah1990s:

Eventually I’m going to gif every joke Carlos tells on Magic School Bus…

moamd:

the only scene we have of the 3 future sisters-in-law

(Source: smiledamon, via iamthebricklayer)

stay-grateful:

housewifeswag:

whose line will forever be one of my favorites

dying rn

(Source: fluoxetinedaydreams, via trashybooks)

Sometimes you can’t let go of the past without facing it again.

 —Gail Tsukiyama, The Samurai’s Garden